Do Non-surgical Treatments Help Maintain Megan Gale’s Youthful Complexion?

Megan GaleMegan Gale, has long been an advocate for aging gracefully, speaking openly about her views on plastic surgery and why she has chosen not to go under the knife. Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Randal Haworth has weighed in on Megan’s age-defying appearance. ‘I understand Megan has denied “going under the knife” and, based solely on her photographs, I tend to believe her,’ Dr. Haworth told Daily Mail Australia this week.

Dr. Haworth, who has not treated Megan himself, described several small, non-surgical procedures she may have undergone to maintain her supermodel look. Haworth also believes that Megan may have had some Botox ‘here and there’ to subtly smooth out her crow’s feet. Megan has spoken candidly about her attitudes toward cosmetic work in the past. In 2016 she told New Idea in 2016 that she would never consider surgery as her former AFL star partner Shaun Hampson, 30, would ‘kill her’.

Megan, who previously dated radio personality Andy Lee, is one of Australia’s most successful fashion exports. Throughout her career, she has graced the covers of countless magazines, including Marie Claire, InStyle, and GQ Australia.

Original Article

Has Married At First Sight Star Ashley Irvin Gone Under the Knife?

In an interview with Daily Mail Australia, Dr. Haworth has offered his expert opinion on whether the Married At First Sight star has gone under the knife.

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon Dr. Haworth believes Ashley Irvin has had some subtle work done on her face and chest. She sparked rumors about a possible breast enlargement after putting on a busty display at the Logie Awards on Sunday.

Ashley Irvin ‘The faint circular ridge bordering the upper portion of her breast strongly suggests the presence of a breast implant’ he said.

Dr. Haworth also believes that Ashley may have made changes to her face in recent years. Observing the ‘visual harmony’ between her lips and teeth, he suggested that Ashley may have invested in lip fillers or veneers.

Dr. Haworth concluded by saying the aforementioned procedures may not be Ashley’s ‘only foray into the world of plastic surgery’.

Original Article

Schapelle Corby’s Post-Prison Makeover? Dr. Haworth Believes It’s Possible With Fillers

Schapelle Corby spent nearly a decade behind bars in Bali’s most notorious jail after being convicted of trafficking marijuana in 2005. But she has transformed her appearance since being released on parole four years ago, sparking rumors of cosmetic enhancements. Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Randal Haworth told Daily Mail Australia on Tuesday that he believes Schapelle Corby may have invested in some ‘non-invasive work’ to achieve her youthful looks.

‘The most obvious changes are to her lips and cheeks,’ Dr. Haworth observed, he believes ‘her lips and cheeks have been well augmented, most likely with injectable fillers such as Juvéderm or equivalent.’ Dr. Randal Haworth claimed he had a ‘sneaking suspicion’ that she may have had ‘injections such as Botox to smooth out the lines and wrinkles around her eyes’ after studying before-and-after photos of Corby Schapelle.

Schapelle Corby Before and After ‘A stint in an Indonesian prison would be a less than welcome holiday, so it’s understandable that anyone would want a fresh start after that,’ he said. ‘It seems as if Ms Corby is no exception to that rule.’

Earlier this year, Schapelle denied having Botox injections or fillers. She told Woman’s Day in March: ‘No fillers, no Botox. I just use Snapchat and Instagram filters! I look at a photo of me and think, “Gee, that’s ugly,” and then I put a filter on it and think, “Actually, it’s pretty good!” ‘With the additional aid of Snapchat filters, her appearance is certainly one for the better,’ Dr. Haworth concluded.

Original Article

The Unknown Risks of Facial Dermal Fillers

In 2011, total cosmetic procedures as reported to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons have increased by 5%. While the majority of that rise has been attributed to the increasing use of noninvasive treatments which include Botox, lasers and fillers, actual surgical procedures have decreased somewhat. This may be more reflective of a rather anemic economy than an actual trend per se. Soft tissue fillers like Hyaluronic acid (Restylane®, Juvederm Ultra®, etc.), calcium hydroxyapatite (Radiesse®), and fat injections experienced some of the largest growth in the minimally-invasive market during 2011. More than 1.3 million hylauronic acid procedures were performed in 2011, up 9 percent; 286,000 calcium hydroxyapatite procedures, up 36 percent; and 68,000 fat injections, up 19 percent. However, in my practice I have noticed a shift back towards surgical procedures such as facelifts-perhaps this is because seasoned, sophisticated patients have come to realize firsthand the limitations of noninvasive treatments.

With the ever expanding embrace of fillers by the population, people are increasingly equating them to a manicure and pedicure. Doctors, Nurses and patients alike rarely think twice about their application and often times are not aware of their potentially serious risks. However, even a recent study has shown that seven out of 10 British doctors have experienced complications with the use of fillers (http://www.inquisitr.com/432110/wrinkles-dermal-fillers-can-cause-blue-skin-and-blindness-report/).

Among the fillers approved for use within the United States include many hyaluronic acids-HA (Juvéderm®, Restyane®, Perlane®, etc.), calcium hydroxyapatite (Radiesse®), PMMA (Artefill®), Sculptra® and fat. The HA’s are associated with their own unique side effects such as the Tyndall effect (a bluish gray swelling that imparts a puffy look to the lower eyes) while Radiesse®, Sculptra® and Artefill® can induce granulomas. However, all of these fillers have been associated with a few extremely rare but potentially devastating complications. Among these are skin necrosis (death of soft tissue) and vision loss. These problems result from a highly unlikely, unforeseen introduction of a minuscule amount of material into a microscopic branch of a facial blood vessel. A very small amount of filler injected into a peripheral vessel around the forehead, nose, nasolabial fold and even lip can result in these aforementioned complications. It is important to note that not only filler, but fat from a facial fat transfer and even a simple steroid injection have been implicated in both tissue and vision loss.

Once in the bloodstream, the filler in turn can travel downstream through the labyrinth of interconnecting blood vessels and if, in the highly unlikely event, it makes a wrong turn, it can end up in one of the blood vessels supplying the retina of the eye. Recently, I was devastated to discover that a patient of mine suffered one sided vision loss because of this very issue. Ironically, she showed no signs of external injury and still appears as a beautiful woman. A few ways for doctors to diminish the chances of such terrible occurrences are to use blunt tip cannulas instead of sharp-tipped needles whenever possible and to inject small amounts while withdrawing the syringe. Though I employ these two techniques routinely even under magnification, there is no absolute guarantee that these complications can be avoided. It is important that patients are made aware of these risks, albeit fleetingly small, in order that they can make an informed decision as to whether to proceed.

“We cannot estimate the incidence of these devastating complications among recipients to filler injections. It must be extremely rare, but it does happen,” Dr. Woo from Seoul National University’s Bundang Hospital told Medscape Medical News. The likelihood of such a devastating event is probably less than being struck by lightning

Odds of being struck by lightning in a given year (reported deaths + injuries)              1/1,000,000
Odds of being struck by lightning in a given year (estimated total deaths + injuries)      1/775,000
Odds of being struck in your lifetime (Est. 80 years)                                                           1/10,000
and certainly less than being injured in a car accident. Even though we are aware of the risks of driving and probably know a few people may have been seriously injured or even killed in a motor vehicle accident, few of us think twice about getting into a an automobile, turning on its ignition and driving.

A good summary of this tragic problem written from an objective standpoint can be accessed here http://www.lipostructure.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Avoidence.pdf

R.D. Haworth M.D., F.A.C.S.

Ironically, two weeks after I wrote this blog, I was involved in a motor vehicle accident  (1 week ago, today being March 12, 2013). Fortunately, no one was seriously injured.

This New Blunt-Tip Needle Screws the Bruise! Dermasculpt

What is Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon, Dr Randal Haworth’s, latest tool to minimize bruising with injections?

Injection techniques to place filler into the face to correct lines, folds and wrinkles have became even more advanced with the use of blunt tip cannulae, such as Dermasculpt. These are similar to needles except that they are not sharp and therefore are less prone to cut the tiny diameter blood vessels in and below the skin.

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What does this mean for the patient?

-Markedly less bruising

-Generally significant less discomfort

-Greater safety profile

I don’t employ them to treat all areas of the face, since certain anatomical facial features require extremely precise placement of filler not afforded by blunt tip cannulae. They are ideal to inject larger areas which require generalized plumping or filling such as the temples, cheek hollows, brows and jawline.

I have injected most types of filler through them including Juvederm, Restylane, Belotero, Artefill, Aquamid and Radiesse.

Be prepared to hear some minor crackling noise, however, for the first minute or so similar to lettuce being cut!

Tricky Lindsay. How Lohan is changing her looks

People seem to always ask me which celebrity did what and why would they do that. Sometimes that is frustrating.

A close friend of mine who is a fine art photographer tells me she can always spot if someone had plastic surgery to which I reply, “No you can’t”…

That is because good plastic surgery is invisible. Therefore, by logical extension, the only plastic surgery she or anybody can recognise is visible. Most  would concur that visible plastic surgery is less ideal than invisible surgery, but this is not always the case. Think Christy Turlington and her obvious rhinoplasty as a reminder of how visible plastic surgery can elevate a face to another worldly, ethereal level and you  will get my point.

Recently Extra asked me to comment what Lindsay had done to herself based on photographs.

Dr Haworth of beverly hills is a specialist in facial plastic surgery, including  rhinoplasty, fillers and facelifts  
Lindsay Lohan in better days   Lindsay Lohan in less better but recent days
This is similar to expecting a detective to know who committed a crime based solely on showing him some iPhone photos. I can only surmise what Lindsay had done. I feel assured to say she definitely had fillers in the past (just look how her lips and cheeks have changed over the years) and a breast augmentation. But recently, the poor woman has undergone more severe change and not for the better.
She looks swollen and has an obvious “double chin”. This to me is a salient clue –

1. Is she simply bloated from substance abuse or withdrawal?

2. Has she gained weight for any number of reasons (in preparation for playing Elizabeth Taylor in Liz and Dick?)

3. Is she swollen after undergoing some involved facial surgery?

Who knows? I am simply a detective here and would need to visit the crime scene, so to speak. I would need to ask questions and perform an examination!



Dr Haworth has no professional affiliation with Lindsay Lohan