Building the optimal in-office OR

Beverly Hills Surgical Center

Building the optimal in-office OR

By Lisette Hilton

1. Flow and Freedom of Movement

Beverly Hills-based plastic surgeon, Randal Haworth, M.D., says he needs to be comfortable and free to move in order to perform facial and body plastic surgery.

But space can be somewhat limited in an OR inside a boutique plastic surgery practice, he says.

“… so careful planning of the envisioned flow between patient, surgeon, scrub tech, circulating nurse and anesthesia provider must be done,” Dr. Haworth says. “In my case, I had to work with a rectangular operating room, in which case I first had to decide where the anesthesia machine would be situated, since its range of movement would be limited by the oxygen and vacuum hoses tethering it to the ceiling. Consequently, it was important for me to have a 180-degree turning radius for the operating table, so I could position it according to whether I am performing facial or body surgery. Of course, OR lights have to follow suit and must be very mobile and bright. My Trumpf LED [Trumpf Medical] system fits the bill nicely.”

2. A Quality Monitor and Sound System

Having a big monitor with a good sound system for music is not only a luxury but a necessity for the modern plastic surgeon. Having the monitor in constant view is a must, according to Dr. Haworth.

3. Intelligently Designed Cabinetry

Proper cabinetry, design to maximize space and efficiency, is essential, according to Dr. Haworth.

“You can never have too many cabinets from the get-go, since these promote organization and obviate the need for vulgar retrofits in the future,” he says. “When it comes to designing my clinic or the operating room, I think that creating and maximizing the feeling of unrestricted space is important for both the patient’s sense of security and the staffs’ sense of clarity.”

4. Don’t Cut Corners

Don’t cut expenses, when it comes to safety, according to Dr. Cohen.

5. Seek Expertise

Dr. Cohen says cosmetic surgeons should tap experts in designing operating rooms.

“Reach out to architects with experience in both the design and credentialing processes,” Dr. Cohen says. “Ultimately, certain third-party inspections may be required, and you don’t want to be caught off guard.”

Dos and Don’ts for the In-office OR

Erin Metelka, an interior designer with Studio Four Design, offers these design dos and don’ts.

OR Dos:

  • Use a sheet flooring, with heat welded seams and sanitary cove base.
  • Use bleach cleanable/non-porous products.
  • Use clean/calming colors.
  • Provide a variety of adjustable ambient lighting options.
  • Utilize floor patterns to designate the extents of the sterile zone and care-provider zones.
  • With the wide variety of procedures that occur in an operating room, often times, the table is moved in order to accommodate the most efficient workflow with the other equipment in the suite. The floor patterns can also be used to dimension the proper location of the table for these various scenarios.
  • When creating several operating rooms, utilize an identical layout (not mirrored). Often, physicians are moving into adjacent operating rooms for a procedure, while a room is being turned over and sterilized. Having identical layouts increases efficiency and reduces error.

OR Don’ts:

  • Do not have extraneous items of décor within the suite, such as artwork.
  • Do not utilize fabric of any kind such as curtains/draperies. If there are windows, create privacy with natural light by using integrated frosted glass. If an upholstery is required for a physician stool or other items, a bleach cleanable vinyl is a suitable alternative, ideally with a Crypton or nano-technology finish applied (these finishes work to prevent moisture penetration to the cushion and function as an antimicrobial).
  • Do not place any direct down-lighting, with the exception of the surgical boom, directly over the table.
Read the original article here!

Rhinoplasty – “Samurai Nostrils”?

As one of the leading rhinoplasty specialists in the United States, Dr. Randal Haworth continues to challenge himself to be the best he can be. By constantly questioning his results and asking himself how he can do things better, he feels he is subjecting himself to the highest quality assurance and delivering the best possible outcomes in plastic surgery .

Performing rhinoplasties are one of my favorite specialty since the nose place such a central role in the total harmony of the face. Consider it like one of the leading instruments in the orchestra. Though most plastic surgeons and patients alike obsess on nasal humps, wide bones as well as drooping, boxy, pinched and ill-defined tips and, of course, the width of the nostrils, little attention is paid to the actual shape of the nostrils. In other words, a surgeon should not only assess whether the nostrils are wide at their base, but also whether they are arched, pointy, thick or sigmoid in shape.

One of the most common and unflattering nostril shape is that of the “samurai nostril”. Look at the following two photographs and you will see what I mean.
Seven samurai
Another example of these flared nostrils that may look appropriate as a menacing sign but not a flattering one for beautiful woman
Flared nostrils of the nose before a rhinoplasty
A samurai mask manifesting the flared, aggressive shaped nostrils that are unappealing in a woman


There are a few ways to correct this but probably the most reliable is to harvest a “composite” graft from the hidden portion of one’s ear. This detailed surgery involves insinuating this graft between an incision made on the inside of the nose, corresponding to the actual width of the retracted portion of the nostril. This graft is then sutured into place with the skin side facing the actual inside of the nostril to maintain the continuity of it’s lining. One can lower the nostril about 3 to 4 mm with this technique. Of course, some resorption of the graft occurs so it is best to over-correct this.

Other techniques involve strategic V-Y plasties, which are essentially internal tissue rearrangements of the inner aspect of the nostril in order to lower its rim, cartilage grafts in the actual substance of the nostril to help correct pinched tips while lowering the rim and, finally, filler. These latter techniques, though successful to some degree, are not as effective as an ear “composite” graft.

Note the following two cases in which “composite” grafts were taken from the ear and placed within the nostril to lower them. Of note, simultaneous upper lip lifts to further enhance a feminine appearance were performed.

Preoperative transgender patient with retracted nostrils
Transgender patient was retracted nostrils, long upper lip and droopy corners of the lip


Transgender patient after composite grafts to lower the nostril rims and an upper lip lift with DAO release
Dr. HAWORTH performed a modified rhinoplasty by lowering the nasal arched “samurai” rims (nostrils) as well as an upper lip lift and DAO release to lift up the droopy corners of the mouth


Patient with a long upper lip and retracted "Samurai"nostrils after a previous rhinoplasty
Patient with a long upper lip and retracted “Samurai”nostrils after a previous rhinoplasty by  another surgeon


Dr. Haworth performed an upper lip lit along with nostril rim lowering and fat transfer to the lips
Dr. Haworth performed an upper lip lift along with nostril rim lowering via a composite graft from the ear. Fat transfer was also performed into the upper and lower lips. Notice the more feminine harmony