Building the optimal in-office OR

Beverly Hills Surgical Center

Building the optimal in-office OR

By Lisette Hilton

1. Flow and Freedom of Movement

Beverly Hills-based plastic surgeon, Randal Haworth, M.D., says he needs to be comfortable and free to move in order to perform facial and body plastic surgery.

But space can be somewhat limited in an OR inside a boutique plastic surgery practice, he says.

“… so careful planning of the envisioned flow between patient, surgeon, scrub tech, circulating nurse and anesthesia provider must be done,” Dr. Haworth says. “In my case, I had to work with a rectangular operating room, in which case I first had to decide where the anesthesia machine would be situated, since its range of movement would be limited by the oxygen and vacuum hoses tethering it to the ceiling. Consequently, it was important for me to have a 180-degree turning radius for the operating table, so I could position it according to whether I am performing facial or body surgery. Of course, OR lights have to follow suit and must be very mobile and bright. My Trumpf LED [Trumpf Medical] system fits the bill nicely.”

2. A Quality Monitor and Sound System

Having a big monitor with a good sound system for music is not only a luxury but a necessity for the modern plastic surgeon. Having the monitor in constant view is a must, according to Dr. Haworth.

3. Intelligently Designed Cabinetry

Proper cabinetry, design to maximize space and efficiency, is essential, according to Dr. Haworth.

“You can never have too many cabinets from the get-go, since these promote organization and obviate the need for vulgar retrofits in the future,” he says. “When it comes to designing my clinic or the operating room, I think that creating and maximizing the feeling of unrestricted space is important for both the patient’s sense of security and the staffs’ sense of clarity.”

4. Don’t Cut Corners

Don’t cut expenses, when it comes to safety, according to Dr. Cohen.

5. Seek Expertise

Dr. Cohen says cosmetic surgeons should tap experts in designing operating rooms.

“Reach out to architects with experience in both the design and credentialing processes,” Dr. Cohen says. “Ultimately, certain third-party inspections may be required, and you don’t want to be caught off guard.”

Dos and Don’ts for the In-office OR

Erin Metelka, an interior designer with Studio Four Design, offers these design dos and don’ts.

OR Dos:

  • Use a sheet flooring, with heat welded seams and sanitary cove base.
  • Use bleach cleanable/non-porous products.
  • Use clean/calming colors.
  • Provide a variety of adjustable ambient lighting options.
  • Utilize floor patterns to designate the extents of the sterile zone and care-provider zones.
  • With the wide variety of procedures that occur in an operating room, often times, the table is moved in order to accommodate the most efficient workflow with the other equipment in the suite. The floor patterns can also be used to dimension the proper location of the table for these various scenarios.
  • When creating several operating rooms, utilize an identical layout (not mirrored). Often, physicians are moving into adjacent operating rooms for a procedure, while a room is being turned over and sterilized. Having identical layouts increases efficiency and reduces error.

OR Don’ts:

  • Do not have extraneous items of décor within the suite, such as artwork.
  • Do not utilize fabric of any kind such as curtains/draperies. If there are windows, create privacy with natural light by using integrated frosted glass. If an upholstery is required for a physician stool or other items, a bleach cleanable vinyl is a suitable alternative, ideally with a Crypton or nano-technology finish applied (these finishes work to prevent moisture penetration to the cushion and function as an antimicrobial).
  • Do not place any direct down-lighting, with the exception of the surgical boom, directly over the table.
Read the original article here!

Healing after Plastic Surgery; State-of-the-Art for 2017.

“Time is a cruel thief to rob us of our former selves. We lose as much to life as we do to death.” Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey

Living in the modern world becomes more complex and harder as life in the 21st-century becomes faster and faster. We are burdened with responsibilities and distracted by an interminable onslaught of media in all forms including the capricious internet. It seems as if everything is competing for our attention in one way, shape or form while stealing precious time we could otherwise devote to family, friends and simply to our  own selves. Therefore, when it comes to saving time, the need to heal quickly after any cosmetic procedure is almost rapacious.

Unfortunately, there is no magic pill or formula to bypass the post operative inflammation of  bruising, swelling and discomfort at this current time. As one of the top plastic surgeons in Beverly Hills, Dr. HAWORTH has seen a thing or two about how patients heal after the thousands of surgeries he has performed over two decades. As a facial plastic surgery expert, he has performed thousands of primary and revision rhinoplasties, brow lift, facelifts and blepharoplasties not to mention the breast implant operations throughout his career and has realized there are things you can do both at home and in the clinical setting to accelerate your healing.

First of all, it is a good idea to focus on whole foods as much as possible while avoiding processed ones as the former will contain the highest levels of vitamins and amino acids your body will need for a speedy recovery.  Amino acids help wounds heal faster and obviously, these are found in  chicken, meats, egg whites, fish, brown rice, healthy nuts like walnuts and almonds or sunflower seeds. Taking supplemental vitamin C in your diet while increasing zinc in your diet can be helpful. Instead of taking vitamin C for a bottle, you can eat strawberries, papayas and citrus fruits which are great sources of vitamin C.  500-1000mg  is the usual amount that is taken. Zinc is found in oysters which have one of the highest levels of zinc found in any food. If you are going to take a supplement, 15 mg of zinc daily is the recommended amount but you can increase your zinc intake to 30–50 mg for 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after surgery, using zinc picolinate.

Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Haworth also recommends these useful supplements to take in preparation for your surgery include:

B12 and Iron – Iron and B12 both aid bone marrow in forming new blood cells, so incorporate foods like fish and eggs.

Vitamin B6  250mg, twice a day for a week, starting 3 days after surgery. This helps reduce post-surgical fluid retention, such as swelling of the face, hands, feet or legs. With B6, you can experience substantial reduction within 24 to 48 hours.

CoQ10- Surgical trauma (particularly from cardiac surgery) causes an increase in free radicals, which  damage cellular function. For this reason alone, you should take at least 50 mg of CoQ10 as part of your daily routine before your cosmetic surgery and 100–200 mg/day for at least 4 weeks after.

Fiber and probiotics – This combination helps boost the immune system and also keeps your digestive tract moving along. Eating yogurt with granola is just one easy way to get a serving of both fiber and probiotics! When choosing a probiotic, consider one that contains acidophilus and bifida bacteria (follow label instructions for dosage). Surgical patients often receive oral or intravenous antibiotics in the hospital, which creates the potential for  yeast infections, digestive disturbances and diarrhea. A probiotic may help counteract these problems.

One amino acid that has been shown to speed with healing is glutamine and a study from Harvard and Dave showed that it shortened healing by about four days. Apart from supplements, glutamine can be found in beef, chicken and all types of fish. Dairy products such as cheese, milk, yogurt and eggs contain glutamine with ricotta and cottage cheese being the two richest sources. Vegetarians can find glutamine in beans and lentils. For most of his patients, facial plastic surgery specialist Haworth recommends supplemental Arnica Montana, Bromelain/ Bromezyme (this pineapple enzyme helps prevent blood clots, aids digestion while decreasing inflammation and pain after surgery) and Pycnogenol/Pine bark. This triumvirate is aimed at reducing bruising, soreness and inflammatory edema. Apart from the above, many patients inquire about any other additional medications, exercises or procedures that can be done to maximally reduce their healing times after surgery. Of course, all patients should ask their individual physicians or surgeons about their own personalized recommendations to speed up recovery which is beyond the scope of this post.  
Bioptron® Light employs a combination of polarized infrared and visible light (480nm-3400nm) considered beneficial in the treatment of wound problems and injuries by exerting its effect at the cellular level. Bioptron® therapy has a low energy density (fluency) of 2.4 J/cm2 at a distance of 10 cm and can penetrate the skin up to 2.5 cm.
This patient had impending skin necrosis around her here after a facelift. Only 7 days of Bioptron ® light therapy were administered and notice the rapid improvement in reversing the damage.
After 5 days of Bioptron® therapy to resolve bruising resulting from lower eyelid procedure to treat her dark circles/tear troughs.
After 3 days of Bioptron® light therapy to accelerate the resolution of bruising and skin injury after a breast reduction by Dr. HAWORTH.

It has been used effectively in the treatment of burns, pressure sores, leg ulcers, wounds, pain and recently, postoperative healing. Dr Haworth have found it very useful in his clinic to reduce both swelling and bruising. Supporting his experience, other plastic surgeons here and abroad have noted decreased resolution times of eccymosis and edema following surgery by over 33% with Bioptron®. Indeed, it has been used to also reverse the course of cutaneous necrosis as well as accelerate granulation of open wounds, either alone or in conjunction with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT).

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized room or tube. It is a well-established treatment for decompression sickness, a hazard of scuba diving. Other conditions treated with HBOT include serious infections, bubbles of air in blood vessels and non-healing wounds as a result of diabetes or radiation injury.

In a HBOT chamber, the air pressure is increased to 3 times higher than normal air pressure and under these conditions, your lungs can gather more oxygen than would be possible breathing pure oxygen at normal air pressure. However, there is some confusion about what actually is “true” HBOT. Those employing “soft” tent like enclosures are essentially useless since they are unable to obtain a true hyperbaric environment of 2 to 4 atmospheres absolute (ATA). In fact, these personal or home-use “hyperbaric”  tent enclosures can usually only attain a pressure of 1.3 ATA. There is a debate as to how much and how many treatments are necessary to speed up recovery after plastic surgery. While most plastic surgeons perhaps recommend one preoperatively and at least 3 to 5 postoperatively, experts in the field say one needs at least 15 to 20 treatments in order to see significant results. In my experience, 3 to 5 treatments are all that is necessary to achieve the more modest goals of reducing edema, bruising and discomfort resulting from elective  plastic surgery.

After certain surgeries, body contouring plastic surgery expert Dr Randal Haworth may also recommend selective lymphatic massage/drainage to resolve edema (swelling)  of the extremities, particularly after liposuction or liposculpture.

The above aforementioned vitamins, nutritional supplements and clinical interventions may not be the panacea to surgical healing which comes in a pill form, but they certainly are a step in the right direction in making recovery from any procedure as smooth as possible in 2017.

Dr Randal Haworth

2017 Beverly Hills

       

ANGELINO (2015)

Anti-aging treatments
The latest in treatments, fillers and procedures help keep you beautifully radiant-at any age. Here’s the inside track on what to do, and who to go to, to put your best self forward. Among those esteem practitioners interviewed by Angelina, Dr. Randal Haworth MD was honored to be included among them. Anti-aging treatments
scan-9“Botox plays in important role in keeping fine lines at bay”, says plastic surgeon Dr. Randal Haworth MD renowned for achieving naturally beautiful results. Haworth suggests conservative use of Botox (from $500, the Haworth Institute) in the 30s to diminish fine lines and crows feet. Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Randal Haworth MD Bellafill ($1200, The Haworth Institute) to permanently diminish deep folds and fill out eyelid hollows.

The most obvious tell-tale sign of a facelift

Good plastic surgery is invisible but many people insist that they can always spot anyone who has had plastic surgery. For example, they claim they can always spot a celebrity with a facelift and list those with obviously sad results that garner all the press. You can refer to the three attached photographs as examples of such. (They go on to name others who have not had any plastic surgery and when I in turn correct them, they express bewildered disbelief.)
Joan Rivers with obvious plastic surgery and pixie-ear deformity
Joan Rivers with look-at-me pixie-ear deformity
 
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Bruce Jenner with a plain-as-day pixie-ear deformity after a facelift
Mickey Rourke sporting his obvious Pixie-ear and man-bun on the red carpet
Mickey Rourke sporting his obvious Pixie-ear and man-bun on the red carpet
However, this blog post is not about good plastic surgery, it is about the bad and the ugly. There are many signs that scream “facelift”:

1. Overly pulled face skin with diagonal grooves

2. Altered hairlines such as pulled-back sideburns

3. Widened, non-hair-bearing scars with step-offs in the natural hairline behind the ear

4. Distorted anatomy in front of the ear canal due to effacement of the delicate tragus cartilage and finally…

5.”Pixie ear”.

Most of these aforementioned problems stem from misplaced anchoring of the newly redraped skin flaps resulting in needlessly excessive tension across potentially visible scars. One immutable rule in plastic surgery dictates that such increased tension can create widened scars, hair loss and distorted anatomy. Yet, despite these well-documented problems, I unfortunately still see many patients who seek correction of these stigmata of ill-conceived facelifts.

Correcting these problems is not an easy task. Generally, a secondary facelift needs to be performed to release enough skin so that both scars can be removed and closure achieved in a tension-free matter. If it happens to be a lucky day, scars that were placed in front of the ear can even be moved more posteriorly to within the ear canal as in this example of a facelift I performed in order to not only make her look younger but also remove her telltale signs of past substandard surgery.

Pixie earlobe after a facelift. Note scar in front of the ear
After correction with revision facelift and tension realignment


Pixie ear deformity and tired appearance after previous facelift
Pixie ear deformity and tired appearance after previous facelift
Note correction of pixie-ear deformity after revision facelift. An endoscopic brow lift, fat transfer and upper lip lift along with a lower blepharoplasty were also performed
Note correction of pixie-ear deformity after revision facelift. An endoscopic brow lift, fat transfer, upper lip lift and a lower blepharoplasty were also performed

The trials, trade-offs and tribulations of upper lip lifts and other plastic surgery.

All plastic surgery has trade-offs.

By trade-offs, I am not referring to complications or risks.

By trade-offs I am referring to subtle and sometimes significant alterations in your appearance that will be incurred by undergoing a certain plastic surgical procedure. It is the doctor’s responsibility to inform the patient of these trade-offs (including risks of complications) while it is the patient’s responsibility to make an informed decision to proceed if he or she feels that the benefits of the surgery will outweigh the risks and trade-offs.

Examples of such trade-offs are the scars in and around the ear that result from a facelift. Even though they may be near invisible, they are scars nonetheless. The majority of patients feel that benefits of the facelift outweighed any of the associated trade-offs. Similarly, patients who undergo an abdominoplasty (tummy tuck), mastopexy (breast lift) or brachioplasty (arm lift) should be fully aware that they will develop scars from those procedures. Though the majority will heal well with very acceptable scars, most of the time the scars will be visible to some degree.

Patients who undergo a rhinoplasty must understand that their nose will be numb, stiff and hard for up to 3 months or more while swelling can persist for 1 to 2 years. Numbness from a facelift or a browlift can last many months as well. Despite understanding these trade-offs, the vast majority of patients have no problem undergoing these procedures once they have decided to do so.

Over the years, I have found it curious that a small minority of patients undergoing lip reshaping surgery in the form of upper lip lifts and V-Y plasties had unrealistic expectations in terms of their healing and results. They were surprised even angry that they experienced numbness, stiffness and associated scarring. Sometimes a very subtle change in the nostril position occurred after the surgery. These trade-offs may arise even though the result of the upper lip lift is successful from the aesthetic standpoint-in other words, the net benefit in the sensual-youthful-beauty quotient for the face has been increased. However, a few may consider the lip lift a failure if they have experienced even a slight degree in any of these trade-offs.

Though these trade-offs can mostly be successfully reversed, a patient should not elect to undergo such a procedure if he or she will not accept that these can be normal aspects of the procedure. If one thinks about it, an upper lip lift will have its trade-offs in the same way other procedures would have their own yet it perhaps gets more attention than other anatomical features of the face because the lips are expected to not only look beautiful but also function as well.

And function they do, more than any other part of the face. Indeed, lips are used to express, emote, eat, kiss and speak-essentially they move millions of times a day! Because of these strong repetitive muscle forces around the nasal and oral region the plastic surgeon must create a strong upper lip lift that will resist these forces in order to achieve a result that is long-lasting, with minimal scarring and nasal distortion.

In fact, lip shaping procedures are the most challenging of all facial plastic surgeries, even rhinoplasties. Though the success of facelifts are measured in centimeters, brow lifts in increments of 2 to 4 mm and rhinoplasties in millimeters, lip reshaping surgery is measured in quarter-to-an-eighth of a millimeter! With those scales, one can almost consider this close to microsurgery.

In 2014, it would be a miracle to undergo an upper lip lift with an unequivocal guarantee of no scarring, nasal distortion, prolonged minor sensory changes and stiffness. If you are contemplating undergoing an upper lip lift but will not tolerate any of these tradeoffs, I suggest you avoid the procedure altogether and wait for that miracle to happen.

Can plastic surgery buy you happiness (especially if you are on Adderall) :)?

  “Plastic surgery won’t make you happy, but it can make you happier”

I think most sentient human beings will agree that the world it’s becoming a crazier place in which to live. We are constantly bombarded by negative imagery, negative stories, negative experiences, negative people while reminded that we are not good enough to fit the ideal as embodied by the media’s ambassadorial cadre of celebrities and certain reality stars. In more recent years, I am seeing an uptick in the amount of negative patients in my practice. I have learned to better recognize them and avoid operating on them as best I can.

Why do I do this?

The answer is simple. I avoid operating on them to better serve them . My staff and I at the Haworth Institute adhere to a basic principle of delivering the best service possible in order to maximally satisfy our patients. Yet, even if I perform the most exemplary plastic surgery and the patient is not happy with the results, then I have failed. In other words, the objective assessment of the surgical results does not match the subjective one of the patient. There are reasons for this break from reality, such as body dysmorphic syndrome and a patient’s own internal anger, discontentment, strife or call it what you will. There is much written about body dysmorphia but little is discussed about the latter situation-the angry, malcontent. Many times, these people come to a plastic surgeon seeking out surgical transformation for the wrong reasons, thinking that the surgery itself will bring a positive change in their life. When that doesn’t transpire and the patient realizes that they are still the same unhappy soul, all hell can break loose for both patient and caregiver because of unrealistic expectations. This may become a greater incendiary situation when a patient is taking Adderall or some other amphetamine-related prescription medication. Consequently, plastic surgeons should be aware of this heretofore anecdotal correlation prior to operating on anyone taking Adderall or equivalent since this may be a predictor of both disproportionate patient disappointment and anger.

I now have come up with the following saying within the last month which resonates with both my staff and myself:  “Plastic surgery will not make you happy, but it can make you happier.” In simple terms, this allows me to assess whether a patient is fundamentally happy and balanced prior to operating on them. I’m sure that there will be a few patients that still slip through the cracks, so to speak, but if I can manage to avoid operating on the majority of angry, unhappy patients then I know in my heart that I did serve them well.

Coincidently, this article just came out today about plastic surgery and happiness:

C’mon get happy! Plastic surgery can help 🙂

Dr. HAWORTH is a board-certified (American Board of Plastic Surgery) plastic surgeon located in Beverly Hills. His specialties include all aspects of aesthetic facial and breast plastic surgery, including rhinoplasty, revision rhinoplasty, facelifts, lip reshaping and breast augmentation. For further information go to drhaworth.com

Tattoos and Cancer

Tattoos are meant to be party fun and expressive… Cancer and infections are such a buzz kill!

To each his own, but I have always been rather impartial to tattoos. Unlike a fine wine, I simply don’t think they age very well and they look especially out of place on a doting grandmother or father (unless they’re a member of a famous rock group and had a bank account to go along with it).

Anyway, onto more pressing matters such as how tattoos can kill you.

As a Beverly Hills plastic surgeon board-certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery, I am always aware I am a doctor first and a plastic surgeon second. It is for this reason I address subjects such as this to inform the public of potentially dangerous trends they embrace. More is written about how tattoos are associated with resistant bacterial infections and skin cancers, especially that the American FDA is applying its investigative microscope to the issue. More ominously, because of hepatitis C transmission, tattoos are associated with liver cancer and the possible necessity of liver transplantation. That is some virulent ink to say the least!

You might read this and think that you’re better off undergoing laser tattoo removal. Unfortunately, while the tattoo might be removed by the laser, blasting away that pigment might release it into the body a second time.

If you’re thinking about getting a tattoo maybe consider using a safer pigment such as InfiniteInk . This does not contain toxins and can be easily removed. It may cost more, but wouldn’t you want a pigment that was developed to color medicines, rather than paints?

To read more about this unsettling topic click here:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2032696/Now-tattoos-cancer-U-S-regulator-probes-fears-inks-contain-carcinogenic-chemicals.html

http://dawn.com/2013/01/25/tattoos-linked-to-hepatitis-c-study/

R.D. Haworth M.D., F.A.C.S.

Brow Lift or Blepharoplasty? That is the Question

You are complaining of saggy upper eyelids. You go to your plastic surgeon.The question is: “Brow lift or blepharoplasty? Or both?”   About 70% of patients coming to me requesting rejuvenation of their upper eyelids have no aging problems with their upper eyelids at all. Instead, what they are really manifesting is a pseudo excess of eyelid skin caused by a sagging of their forehead and its associated eyebrows ( brow ptosis). The skin between the eyebrows and the upper eyelashes is now compressed into folds, giving the impression age- related excess eyelid skin. It is imperative from an aesthetic and functional standpoint that the plastic surgeon makes the correct diagnosis, differentiating brow ptosis from true excess eyelid skin. Sometimes the two conditions can coexist like in Kenny Rogers pre-surgery.
Kenny Roders Before any surgery. Note how he has a combination of heavy brows and excess eyelid skin.
Kenny Rodgers Before any surgery. Note how he has a combination of heavy brows and excess eyelid skin.
The treatment for brow ptosis is an endoscopic Browlift (which I will discuss in a future blog post and how to avoid the “surprised-look”) while that for excess eyelid skin is an upper blepharoplasty. Sometimes strategic fat transfer or filler injection above and into the brow can help reversed brow ptosis to a moderate degree. I have seen many unfortunate results of upper eyelid surgery or blepharoplasty, stemming not from poorly performed surgery, but simply from a wrong diagnosis. In other words, the wrong surgery was correctly performed for the wrong diagnosis. I have also seen the correct surgery performed but carried out too aggressively such as in the case of Mr Rogers. If you compare his presurgical picture to the post surgical picture, one could see that his eyes are too recessed because too much fat and skin was removed.
Note the overaggressive brow lift and upper blepharoplasty leaving him with unnaturally hollow upper eyelids.
Note the overaggressive brow lift and upper blepharoplasty leaving him with unnaturally hollow upper eyelids.
Unnaturally deep recessed eyes as seen in these male celebrities can result- the upper eyes are bizarrely punched out in a feminized fashion not usually seen in nature. Yes , the upper lids are clean, but they are too sculpted and when placed adjacent to a still sagging brow, they results are just plain unattractively weird.
Wayne Newton before any plastic surgery.
Wayne Newton before any plastic surgery.
Wayne Newton after an overaggressive upper blepharoplasty. He probably would've been best served by a subtle brow lift alone
Wayne Newton after an overaggressive upper blepharoplasty. He probably would’ve been best served by a subtle brow lift alone
Don’t confuse this condition with people who have naturally deep set eyes such as Jeremy Irons.
Jeremy Irons has naturally deep set eyes. This is who he is and it looks completely natural.
Jeremy Irons has naturally deep set eyes. This is who he is and it looks completely natural.
Mr. Irons still has his natural character embedded in his countenance, whereas the aforementioned public figures who have had overly aggressive brow and eyelid surgery seem to had their essence extracted from their face.   For further information or to make a consultation with Dr. Randal Haworth, a Beverly Hills plastic surgeon and specialist in eyelid and browlift surgery,call 310 273 3000 or visit him at www.drhaworth.com.

“The Lifestyle Lift”-LSL . Does that really stand for the long scar lift?

  The myths and realities of the Lifestyle Lift

As with any service industry, there are convenience stop businesses and destination businesses. You see that with restaurants (think of McDonald’s or Chili’s versus French Laundry, one of the best restaurants in the United States) and you see this concept applicable to the plastic surgery business. I stress the term business  and not medical field for a reason in this essay. I can safely say that most people that pursue higher education in any country do so to seek a better life, better pay and have more opportunities come their way. Of course, most scrupulous doctors experience immense satisfaction from treating their patients as well and, cynically speaking, are not simply in it for the financial award.

Like all professionals, doctors do seek out (and deserve) a certain financial reward for all the years of dedication, study, stress and life sacrifice they undergo in order to carry out their profession and deliver the best care they can to their patients. However, in this day and age of increasing competition and commoditization in all aspects of health care including plastic surgery, surgeons are forced to perform more surgeries at lower costs and possibly increased medical risk to patients. This alarming trend can especially be seen in plastic surgery where the end results of a hastily performed surgery are not hidden within a body cavity but are plainly visible on the face. Some of my colleagues brag about the speed at which they perform a surgery citing the many corners that they “cut” during an operation as unnecessary steps (no pun intended). I suppose they feel more akin to a Usain Bolt than that of a gifted watchmaker.

This brings me to the title of this blog post-The Lifestyle Lift. To the unsuspecting public this facelift is heavily marketed as a viable, simpler, safer, faster quality facelift at a fraction of the price. In fact, this facelift is an overly simplified distillation of pre-existing ideas wrapped in a new packaging as something brand-new and revolutionary. The one aspect that is revolutionary about this facelift is that it is one of the first surgeries that has been rebranded and marketed directly to the “consumer”. The company then refers the “consumer’ to one of their participating surgeons in the network to become a patient. Unfortunately, as a Beverly Hills plastic surgeon board-certified by the American Board of plastic surgery, I have seen many results of this “Lifestyle Lift” that reek “cookie-cutter surgery” in which performance is measured in terms of speed and not quality.

I have seen many unacceptable, hideously widened scars most probably stemming from the fact that the surgeon did not perform a wide enough dissection to allow a tension-free closure (which is tantamount to a good scar). I have also consulted with many patients who were dismayed by how the “Lifestyle Lift” failed to meet their expected goals with incomplete treatment of their jowls, neck and midface.

While it is true that all surgeons have their small subset of unhappy patients either because of unrealistic expectations, sub-optimal results or unexpected complications, the large percentage of unhappy patients complaining of their “Lifestyle Lift” is too hard to ignore. For a good article on the subject that appeared in Plastic Surgery Practice.

Traditional Liposuction versus 360 Liposculpture

Dr Haworth, a specialist in Liposuction in Beverly Hills, describes a new technique of Liposuction that improves upon traditional techniques. He calls this 360 liposculpture and delivers unprecedented results in terms of achieving the ideal human body shape. He has performed this procedure on hundreds of patients ranging from Hollywood celebrities to showgirls and housewives



My staff and I are frequently asked why it takes me longer to perform my body contouring procedures compared to other plastic surgeons. This is because most surgeons intensely dislike performing Liposuction  (or suction assisted lipectomy [SAL] as it is known in plastic surgical parlance) and use it simply as a tool to “debulk” or reduce the size of a body part. Little attention is paid to actually contouring the body itself by creating provocative curves and beautiful blends from one anatomical section into the other. This is true body reinvention at its best.

How is 360° liposculpture performed?

With unwavering concentration, with meticulous careful attention to detail, with minute cannulae (the small tubes through which the fat is aspirated), with a intimate familiarity of techniques ranging from conventional tumescent liposuction to laser-assisted  and syringe. Syringe, you may ask? Yes- this low tech technique provides the most control for the surgeon. allowing him to sculpt the most minute of body  contour irregularities- liken the detail provided by actual hand stitching in clothes to machine stitched. Even though the average person may not notice the difference (especially if he or she considers the procedure a commodity), a true connoisseur will appreciate  the exceptional result afforded by  360 liposculpture. This technique is not for the surgeon with a faint of heart- it is extremely exhausting, time-consuming and demanding of one’s most exceptional skills. Of course, a keen eye and appreciation of human form and beauty is a must.

What are some of the benefits of this 360° liposculpture?

A sublime result maximally customized for each individual patient. Some of the added benefits of 360 liposculpture are obtained by creating a youthful midline abdominal groove, enhancing the waist, reducing unsightly “bra strap” fat bulging, reshaping the ankles and calves fabulously from all angles, contouring beautifully elegant knees and sculpting feminine shoulder and arm definition down to and past the elbow, etc, etc..The list goes on.

However, this technique will not improve stretch marks or cellulite (Nor will any other Lipo suction technique for that matter). A high degree of skin contraction will result. A few examples will follow:

Fat waist pre liposuction
Note the back rolls, ill defined waist and thick shapeless midsection


After 360 Liposculpture of the abdomen and waist
After 360 Liposculpture of the abdomen, back and waist


Before Liposuction of the abdomen and waste
Note how the three-quarter view shows how the hip roll and back are compressed together in an acute angle. With 360 liposculpture, Dr. HAWORTH is able to elegantly “open up” that acute angle, thereby rendering a far more elegant look to the body. The patient consequently looks taller as well.


After 360 liposculpture of the abdomen waist and back
With 360 liposculpture, Dr. HAWORTH is able to elegantly “open up” that acute angle, thereby rendering a far more elegant look to the body. The patient consequently looks taller as well.


Note the lack of shape in her lower legs.
This patient would not wear certain dresses because she was embarrassed by the shape of her lower legs. She felt that they were bulky and lacked shape. They did not ascribe to her ifeminine ideal. Diet and/or exercise would not give her the results she was looking for.


360 liposculpture of the calve, knees and ankles
Dr RANDAL HAWORTH performed 360 liposculpture of the calves, knees and ankles to create an elegant look in her lower legs which she thought otherwise impossible up to now. Diet or exercise cannot obtain this type of result


For further information, go to drhaworth.com or call 310-273-3000 to arrange an appointment with Dr. Randal Haworth, a Beverly Hills plastic surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.
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